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Ross Munro and Brent Neil at the 
​New York International Independent Film & Video Festival in Los Angeles, 2012


Fifty thousand Canadian dollars, a great script, a great cast and just to top the fruit, glorious black and white…what more could you ask for of an independent flick? Well, for starters, this just so happens to be one of the best debuts I’ve seen in a long time…read on to find out why. Benjamin Willcock


"And while this compliment may not mean much coming from a lifelong Yankee, but Brewster McGee's is lovably "Canadian." 

It was voted by The Vancouver Sun as one of the best Canadian films of all time, and from my travels to our northern brother and my study of that country's excellent output of cinema, I know a good Canadian picture when I see one, and Brewster McGee is it.

Again - nothing in Brewster McGee reinvents the wheel, but the obscenity-laden quicksand the film's small cast concocts within the framework of writer and director Ross Munro's loosey-goosey screen universe makes this film a memorable, dark comedic extravaganza. A great midnight movie." Mike Restaino 

DVD File


“Shot cheap, in grainy b&w on 16mm, 'Brewster McGee' is like Samuel Beckett writ small. Vancouver-based writer/director Ross Munro came up with a five-hander that is a hilariously definitive statement on friendship, male-female relationships, and power dynamics in a fast-food world."

Brewster McGee

BIG IDEAS. SMALL MINDS. 


Canadian filmmaker Ross Munro's debut feature, "Brewster McGee" is a profane, darkly humorous look at what happens to big ideas in small minds. Brewster (Brent Neale from Guy Maddin's Careful, Dracula) and his hippie buddy Malcolm (Reid Edwards) are a couple of dangerously obsessive misfits who spend their lives together hatching grandiose marketing strategies and improbable get-rich-quick schemes from the confines of a rusted-out jalopy in the parking lot of the Chicken Hut. Their twisted attempts to ensnare a lonely unsuspecting employee, Oliver (Don Ackerman), of that establishment into their low-rent world meets with disturbing and savagely funny results.